Here you will be able to find answers to all of our most Frequently Asked Questions. Click a title in the table of contents to be taken to the answer. Or just scroll through our list of questions. There is a lot of good information here. If you would like more information, please call us during business hours or use the form on our contact us page.



Table of Contents | Click a question or scroll down to read them all.


Q: Is soft water safe to drink?


Q: What about all the sodium used to regenerate a water softener?


Q: Do I need the minerals in my water?


Q: What about sodium alternatives?


Q: Can we bypass our drinking water in the kitchen cold and refrigerator?


Q: What type of salt should I buy?


Q: Is soft water hard on my septic system?


Q: Should I connect my water softener to hot water only?


Q: What is the slick smooth feeling I get when I bathe or shower in soft water?




Q: Is soft water safe to drink?

A: Cat ion Exchange resin has been in use since the 1850’s. This question has been asked since then. At this time there are no warnings associated with drinking soft water.

Click for WQA report consumption of low TDS water.

Top of Page



Q: What about all the sodium used to regenerate a water softener?

A: The majority of the sodium is used during the regeneration cycle. What actually comes in on the drinking water side is very minimal. For example, Kalispell city water runs 12 grains hard. The amount of sodium that would ion exchange no matter whose water softener you own is 90 milligrams per quart of water. One cup of milk has 122 milligrams of sodium in it. That is four glasses of soft water before you equal what is in a cup of milk.(WQA Source of dietary sodium).

Click for WQA article on Restrictive Salt Diets and Sodium in Softened Water.

Click for WQA answer to sodium intake restrictions and bathing in softened water.

Top of Page



Q: Do I need the minerals in my water?

A: No. The calcium and magnesium in water are in-organic. Unless it is tied up with an organic mineral, we will not use it in our body. For example, we don’t nibble on rocks in the morning to get our calcium. Minerals in water gives water some flavor, that’s all.

Top of Page



Q: What about sodium alternatives?

A: Potassium is used as an ion exchange alternative. Potassium does have a warning label on it. Potassium is used differently in our body. You should consult your doctor before using potassium as an alternative regenerate.

Top of Page



Q: Can we bypass our drinking water in the kitchen cold and refrigerator?

A: If we can get to the plumbing, we can run hard water to just the kitchen cold, and refrigerator. So you don’t have to drink soft water.

Top of Page



Q: What type of salt should I buy?

A: One of the most popular salt being used in the water softening industry is extra coarse salt. You should look for labeling on the package letting you know how pure the salt is. For example, it should read 99.8% pure salt. You should also look for the word “SOLAR” on the bag. It is a much cleaner salt.

Pellets are also available. Make sure you look for purity labeling on the bags of pellets also.

Rust buster salt is used for heavy iron water. This cubed salt has a chemical added to it to help remove the iron off the resin bead. This product can help you keep your water softener from becoming iron bound.

Top of Page



Q: Is soft water hard on my septic system?

A: Water softeners pose no problems for septic tanks. The University of Wisconsin and the National Sanitation foundation (NSF) did a long study on possible adverse effects of discharging softener recharge into septic tanks. The test confirmed that water softener waste effluents actually caused no operational problems.(Consumer Bulletin NO. 01/80)

Click for WQA article on septic tanks and softening.

Click for WQA article on the effects of using a water softener on your septic system.

Top of Page



Q: Should I connect my water softener to hot water only?

A: When you put a water softener on hot water only, you will protect the hot water tank and the dish washer. Hot water would only protect half of the wash machine water tank, and the dish washer. Hot water would only protect half of the wash machine (not all laundry is done hot only.) Plumbing a water softener into hot and cold will protect all of your fixtures and toilets. This does not mean you have to drink soft water. If plumbing to the kitchen sink cold, and refrigerator are accessible they can be by-passed.

Click for WQA article on the economical solutions of soft water.

Top of Page



Q: What is the slick smooth feeling I get when I bathe or shower in soft water?

A: Most people feel the slick smooth feeling you get from soft water and believe this is soap being left on their skin. Soft water does just the opposite. With hard water you have a harder time removing the soap from your skin. In some cases the harder the water, the drier your skin gets. With soft water you are finally removing the soap from your skin, and it’s your natural oils you are feeling. Most people, after a couple weeks of showering or bathing in soft water, don’t notice the slick smooth feeling. They do notice the dryness in their skin when they are bathing in hard water again. We have washed our hands for years to show people which hand has soap on it. In our demo we will wash both hands, rinse one hand in soft water and the other hand in hard water. We have you lick the back of your hand and tell us which hand you taste the soap on. If you were to taste soap on your soft water rinsed hand, I don’t think we would do this demonstration.

Top of Page